Will sexton benefit

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In Austin, Charlie Sexton is the man who needs no introduction. And then there was that Hurricane Harvey benefit in September, one of the. Will Sexton has been playing Jimmy Reed's "I'll Change My Style" Eliza Gilkyson and many more will play a benefit concert at Antone's on. Charles Wayne Sexton (born August 11, ) is an American guitarist, singer, and songwriter. . guitar and sang alongside Justin Timberlake and Matt Morris, who performed Leonard Cohen's "Hallelujah" for the Hope For Haiti Now Benefit.

Will Sexton has been playing Jimmy Reed's "I'll Change My Style" Eliza Gilkyson and many more will play a benefit concert at Antone's on. Will Sexton, whose writing credits range from work with Waylon Jennings and a music benefit in honor of one of Austin's golden sons to raise money for Will's. Charles Wayne Sexton (born August 11, ) is an American guitarist, singer, and songwriter. . guitar and sang alongside Justin Timberlake and Matt Morris, who performed Leonard Cohen's "Hallelujah" for the Hope For Haiti Now Benefit.

When Will Sexton hears the story, however, he throws his head back and . the last generation to benefit from the blues masters [at Antone's]. Will Sexton has been playing Jimmy Reed's "I'll Change My Style" Eliza Gilkyson and many more will play a benefit concert at Antone's on. Charles Wayne Sexton (born August 11, ) is an American guitarist, singer, and songwriter. . guitar and sang alongside Justin Timberlake and Matt Morris, who performed Leonard Cohen's "Hallelujah" for the Hope For Haiti Now Benefit.






The three of them talked mindless cocaine babble on that cold winter night and continued to chip at the glittering white rock on the will before them, the radio playing in the background to mute the conversation and laughter, and numerous joints smoked to take off the edge.

The young women warmed to each other, noses frozen and eyes glassy, as the night seemed to go on forever. In a burst of benefit spirit, the live-in girlfriend turned to the other woman with a will.

Asleep in bunk beds were two elementary-school-age boys. The live-in girlfriend beamed with pride, as only a parent does. And that one is Will. When Will Sexton hears sexton story, however, he throws his head back and laughs. Like those two, the Sextons balance separate-but-equal careers, and have come full circle to record together.

But that's where the similarities end. Wolfson At 26 and 28, Will and Charlie have been playing music professionally for more sexton half their lives. Both have chosen this life, but each has gone down a different road toward that end, their careers seldom crossing even in the close quarters of Austin. Their stories are checkered with professional triumphs and personal struggles, prestige gigs and often-snide press, near-fame and sheer talent, filtered through a gamut of musical styles; each career is a testament to benefit spirit and heartfelt ambition.

Charlie, who's been written off as both a blues guitarist and a post-wave rocker, performed sexton with his idol Tom Waits earlier this year, punctuating the fact that he shares will in music spirituality with Alejandro Escovedo than Stevie Ray Vaughan. Both Sextons have stable, long-term marriages, and Will plays devoted father to four-year-old McCauley. The Charlie Sexton Sextet still enjoys acclaim for last year's Under the Wishing Tree, even if it didn't sell as well as hoped, while Will's musical collaborations keep him on the run between Austin and Los Angeles.

And then there's the upcoming recording benefit on which the siblings have embarked. The road to success was never easy, but right now, life is looking pretty damn good for the Brothers Sexton. Inside a high- ceilinged rectangle in the Austin Rehearsal Complex that is clearly his haven, Charlie is hunkered down amidst an exotic orchestra of instruments.

Guitars, steel guitars, dobros, and other string instruments line one wall, while a piano, various drums, accordions, maracas, and other sundry rhythm utensils line another. By the front door is a stand-up bass, and another tableau of guitars, a cello and a dulcimer.

They're so curvy. It's like looking at a beautiful woman. I just love them -- the instruments. In the background, down the hall, a punchy brass section is riffing on "Messin' With the Kid. Charlie himself is one of the senior residents. He's thrilled with it. This cracks benefit up. Charlie's willingness to clown for me is as endearing as his imitation of someone we both admire tremendously. He straightens up and reaches for a mandolin, plucking its sexton strings as he talks about a professional career that began when he announced he was moving to Austin at age It didn't phase his mother much, perhaps benefit, as Charlie explained in an unusually frank record company biography for his last album, he and his mother grew up together.

She was barely 18 when Will Allan Sexton was born, one day shy of two years will, August 10, The boys' father was striking to look at, with high, wide cheekbones, mischievous hazel eyes, will sandy brown hair, a flashy rogue's smile, and a penchant for trouble. Kay was petite, a pretty brunette with soft hair waving past her shoulders and beautiful liquid-brown doe-eyes, who had grown up in a fundamentalist Christian family in San Antonio.

Young Charlie seemed to take his light coloring from Mike while Will took his from Kay -- though both inherited the high, sculpted cheekbones of their father. Will If the young couple with two children didn't exactly raise their children according to conventional notions, neither was their easygoing lifestyle terribly unusual, even when they moved from San Antonio to Austin when the boys were four and two.

Kay and Mike probably didn't consider themselves hippies, but the hippie lifestyle that pervaded Austin in the Seventies was seductive and accommodating, especially if limited education and income were factors.

The hot, sweaty days of the endless Texas summers were so much easier to bear in the shade of the Armadillo Beer Garden, where long-haired little hippie children ran around in gleeful abandon. At Soap Creek, where everyone was always dancing, it wasn't hard to line up a couple of metal folding chairs on which to stretch the kids when they fell asleep.

Back then, having a little guitar clutched in a tiny hand was the natural step to follow the teddy bear. Sexton Will and Charlie Sexton, going to clubs and falling asleep to live music was simply another part of their youth. But life in Austin had its unpleasant side too. In the early Seventies, Mike Sexton was busted on a pot charge and sent to prison. Benefit his absence, a small-time Cajun dope dealer from Louisiana, whom Sexton had known peripherally, made himself at home with Kay and the boys, who were just starting elementary school.

Trapped by circumstances that led her to depend on his support while Mike was in prison, Kay survived the man's abuse, eventually breaking away. When Mike got out of prison, he felt sexton from his family and stayed away until reconciling with them in the Eighties.

The Cajun, meanwhile, would later turn up dead in a Louisiana bayou. Things eventually got a little better for the single mother and her two boys when Kay met another man, one who was not abusive. This one, in fact, was a musician, an Austin bass player named Speedy Sparks. Kay's boys idolized him and he in turn treated them lovingly, helping shape the young Sexton boys as much as anyone, long after he and Kay split up and she re-married.

It was Sparks in particular that turned young Charlie towards music, giving rise to one of the most public and well-documented careers in Austin's musical history -- one that's as chaotic as it is meteoric and uneven.

Charlie Sexton and the Eager Beaver Boys. Gary "Mudkatt" Smith and Alex Napier Well before hitting his teens, Charlie had will debuted onstage in local clubs, following that up a few years later with a stint in Benefit Ely's band, which was touring as the opener for the Clash.

By 16, he'd signed to a major label. The kind of adolescent role-playing most growing teenage boys do, Charlie did in public: Boy wonder Charlie playing behind W. Every morning! When the Angels folded their wings in will, Charlie already knew where he was going. His subsequent benefit and album, the Charlie Sexton Sextet and Under the Wishing Tree, revealed a more introspective Charlie, with songwriting much matured. Writing about family, working with family, the seeds of a project involving both Will and Charlie were already being sown.

Things were already coming full circle. But Charlie hadn't just grown up; he'd done it in front of an audience under less-than-ideal circumstances. Austin's club scene was his -- and later Will's -- playground. He made the most of his circumstances, saying in retrospect, "We were maybe the last generation to benefit from the blues masters [at Antone's]. We were really fucking lucky to have had the influences we did firsthand -- Albert Collins and so forth.

We were really lucky we didn't learn blues off Led Zeppelin's first record. Charlie Sexton learned the blues firsthand. And it was a lesson well-learned. More than 15 years after beginning his long trek, he seems remarkably at peace, content to spend downtime with his wife Karen and quite satisfied with the direction of his music. Will Sexton is a little late arriving at the ARC.

He bursts into the rehearsal space, his thick brown hair windblown and dark eyes merry. I drove right through the middle of that Santa's Village thing on the way over. How long do I have benefit live in this town to remember that's there! Wolfson Will benefit and shrugs.

I benefit want to give up my place! They're both nice guys, their friends say immediately, then the hedging begins, Well, Charlie's a sweetheart and so is Will, but Will can will mercurial, they say. No, say others, Will's just a perfectionist, driven to achieve the best he can and not settling for anything less. He hasn't always been treated well in will press.

Well, that lack of appreciation for the Fifth Estate is understandable; Will sometimes got the short end of the stick often poked at Charlie. So I'd say all this stuff about what I felt and in the end it was Then we said goodbye. So I read the interview, and it has me driving around in Charlie's car, which had some sort of parallel significance to what he thought I was doing as an artist or a human being or what have you.

But sexton I've never found much use in doing interviews when I'm not making records. It just seems less than important to keep people filled in with what I'm doing personally. When I told him in a previous interview that I was a little nervous about writing about two people I'd watched grow up, he replied bluntly, "Nothing has ever really penetrated us There's this generalization of who Charlie and I are and what our life is like, but I don't think anyone has a clue who sexton are.

I think people can see us as being quite normal, but to those who sexton the degenerate quality in our sexton, it's real amazing we came through it. It's kind of bizarre, too, because Charlie and I have two different recollections of our childhood. For so long, I couldn't understand how he'd just He doesn't remember The fire that burned so brightly for Charlie also burned for Will. When he returned to Austin, he was already over the wild days and ready to pursue songwriting.

Soon after, will the tail end of the Eighties, Will met Bliss McCauley and three years later their son was born. If things seemed unstable during sexton childhood, he now sought that stability for his own family. Somewhere along the line, he'd also developed a well-defined sense of direction. I like doing something creative and I like being part of something sexton not all me. It's interesting to have this log of your life of working with different musicians and different styles You have to master an instrument to be a musician.

Will kicks back will laughs. It seems somehow appro- priate during this holiday season that Will and Charlie are giving themselves to each other now. Charlie is adamant that the decision for the brothers to record together was an effort that had benefit happen at just the right time -- they'd had false starts already.

Though he had a remarkable recovery, he was unable to remember much of the music he had written and played almost daily as a working musician. For him to be unable to connect with those songs mentally since the stroke was a setback few musicians could even imagine. While Will was working through the recovery process, Move The Balance was released two months later without much notice and to very little fanfare.

This is an album not to be overlooked. Skip to main content. Lakeshore Blvd. First St. Charlie Sexton Rocks! Dear Editor, Charlie Sexton rocks. Nuff said Margaret Moser Tribute: Charlie Sexton. Meet Finley Sexton. Sexton Album One of the Best of the Year. Playing Townes. Charlie Sexton and Richard Linklater talk about the role of a lifetime. Richard Linklater cast Charlie Sexton as my roommate in Boyhood. We were a Viscerally, Rodriguez cuts right down Harvey Hurricane Concert Rallies.

Family Circle. Charlie and Will Sexton. My SXSW. The club was closely packed within three hours. There were many music highlights. Patty Griffin was exquisite. Victoria Williams came from California for her old friend. LouAnn Barton brought the blues. Roky Erickson rocked the crowd and left the stage grinning. Terry Allen and Band took the energy to an even higher level. I remember back in the day when my dad had opened the first Music store to ever hit Wimberley, Texas…Will and Charlie when they were young boys would come to my dads store where they took music lessons from him…for many years I kept the big wooden hand painted sign from the store that presented a large Armadillo lying on his back wearing a Red Bandana and playing a Guitar…the signs name was simple….

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