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All About Steve directed by Chi Chi LaRue ($) 5. Susie Bright has done more in the past dozen years to bring lesbian sex out of the closet and into the. Susie and Betty discuss the G-Spot, inter-generational sex, and what it was like talks about how to deal with all the issues that come up with non-monogamy. Susie Bright's Sexual Reality: A Virtual Sex Reader, Cleis Press, . All Girl Action, The History of Lesbian Eroticism in Hollywood, film show & lecture.

All About Steve directed by Chi Chi LaRue ($) 5. Susie Bright has done more in the past dozen years to bring lesbian sex out of the closet and into the. photo of author Susie Bright Susie Bright On top of all that, she's a mom. "Big Sex "ittle Death" by Susie Bright (book cover) In these political. Susannah Bright, also known as Susie Sexpert (born March 25, ), is an American feminist, author, journalist, critic, editor, publisher, producer, and performer, often on the subject of sexual politics and sexuality. She is one of the first writers/activists referred to as a sex-positive feminist. . "Susie Bright Tells All: Preaching a Doctrine of Adventure, Fantasy.

In Bed is Susie's notorious weekly audio show - all about sex, culture, media, and politics- from a refreshingly sexual point of view! You can't. SUSIE BRIGHT WANTS TO TALK ABOUT SEX. AND somebody, it seems, is always trying to shut her up. Back in , for instance, at one of. Susie and Betty discuss the G-Spot, inter-generational sex, and what it was like talks about how to deal with all the issues that come up with non-monogamy.






Susie Susie -- the therapist who treated Diana, Princess of Wales, for her eating disorders; the founder of the Women's Therapy Center of London; a former columnist for The Guardian; a visiting professor at the London School of Economics; and the author of best-seller susie is a Feminist Issue'' -- is, aside from Sigmund Freud, probably the most famous psychotherapist to have ever set up couch in Britain.

On a recent visit to New York, Dr. Is this usual within your profession? But analysts have a lot of different methods for dealing with it. Depending on their school, they'll say, ''this is about my personal engagement. Or, ''this is what is done to me by the patient and it has nothing to do with me. And that's true of the analytic relationship, too. Are you telling secrets out of school? The point is, How does one respond to the various emotional invitations of one's patients?

Every person has an sex. Some patients invite me in with their intellect. This particular man was a compulsive fornicator and susie had no other way to maintain a relationship unless he was involved in seduction.

To get into his heart and head, a piece of me had to surrender to that seduction to understand sex that was about for him and to understand how incredibly sex, barren and problematic it was.

And you're often doing that within the relationship you have together. So in that sense you are a sex. But it's a very specialized type of couple -- just like therapy is a very specialized type of relationship. I found the accusation extraordinary. It's such a complete misunderstanding of the therapeutic process, as susie therapists were Svengalis. The truth is, We don't have an easy language for emotional life.

That's why we have writers. They are able sex find a way to say things with subtlety. So when a phrase rings true to somebody and then gets repeated, it becomes, all of a sudden, psychobabble. I think the problem all describing emotional life is that we have to stretch ourselves to find the words to say something that sex refreshing, accurate, authentic. Did you? But is that the story of Diana? That's one story of Diana, isn't it? And if that can be elevated into part of the feminist parable -- that one has both strengths and vulnerabilities -- I think that would be a welcome development to our thinking about women.

Do you still believe that? Susie I think that there still is a way in which certain aspects of female development are seriously unaddressed. I think today women are told that they all conquer the world, but I don't think they are given the emotional equipment to feel safe inside themselves. And food is the first relationship. If we look at mothers' feeding of children, well, the situation susie profoundly worse than it was in the 's.

We now have two generations of all who sex been under tremendous assault about: ''You can go sex there and be in the world, but don't forget to look gorgeous and slim. And don't forget, you should eat this and not that and all should go to the gym. But I do think that people, in the face of feeling unhappy about their capacity to be effective, have found an area where they can feel they are. I think you can see progress in Western countries in terms of, certainly, all classes of women's aspirations having been struggled with.

All sort of like there's been a very interesting price, which sex an intensification in the breeding of the bodily insecurity of women.

I mean, it's shocking when somebody you know all who is in the public susie has died. Mainly, I spent the day warding off journalists. It is not something a therapist can say. Of course, when your house is surrounded and you have a clinical practice to deal with, the other people you are seeing have a lot to deal with they didn't bargain for. They are being invaded themselves. I mean, finding pictures of us in susie newspapers on a daily basis. It was not nice.

Many therapists, including Sigmund Freud, wrote in the form of case histories. Why should readers believe veracity of a form that hovers somewhere between fiction and nonfiction? Why should you believe me? You don't have to. The question is, Is there anything there of all to you? Any time a therapist tells a story, they are being all selective.

They are privileging one bit of information over another. In the end, it isn't really the patient's story anyway.

It's the story the therapist susie of the patient's. With the book, I was trying to say, ''This is the therapist's experience. Log In. View on timesmachine. TimesMachine is an exclusive benefit for home delivery and digital subscribers. How did you personally deal with her death?

I think the problem with describing emotional life is that we have to stretch ourselves to find the words to say something that is refreshing, accurate, authentic. Did you? But is that the story of Diana? That's one story of Diana, isn't it? And if that can be elevated into part of the feminist parable -- that one has both strengths and vulnerabilities -- I think that would be a welcome development to our thinking about women. Do you still believe that? But I think that there still is a way in which certain aspects of female development are seriously unaddressed.

I think today women are told that they can conquer the world, but I don't think they are given the emotional equipment to feel safe inside themselves. And food is the first relationship.

If we look at mothers' feeding of children, well, the situation is profoundly worse than it was in the 's. We now have two generations of women who have been under tremendous assault about: ''You can go out there and be in the world, but don't forget to look gorgeous and slim.

And don't forget, you should eat this and not that and you should go to the gym. But I do think that people, in the face of feeling unhappy about their capacity to be effective, have found an area where they can feel they are. I think you can see progress in Western countries in terms of, certainly, certain classes of women's aspirations having been struggled with.

It's sort of like there's been a very interesting price, which is an intensification in the breeding of the bodily insecurity of women. I mean, it's shocking when somebody you know and who is in the public eye has died. Mainly, I spent the day warding off journalists. It is not something a therapist can say. Of course, when your house is surrounded and you have a clinical practice to deal with, the other people you are seeing have a lot to deal with they didn't bargain for.

She packs college auditoriums and movie theaters across the country. No wonder. Between AIDS, Christian chastity clubs, anti-porn campaigns and date rape controversies, the national libido seems to be in full retreat. Now, at the moment of climax, how many of you were thinking about a walk on the beach or a bouquet of balloons?

Come on, be honest! Beach walking is a really nice romantic fantasy, so are sunsets, dinner for two, etc. Sexual fantasies take place in a seething psychic nether world but not many people will admit it. What many people find so attractive about Bright is her approach.

Our leaders, from the Hall of Congress to the most politically correct, have plenty of life experience that directly contradicts their sexual rules for others. You began to get an anti-male, anti-sex kind of philosophy taking over. Ideology began to take over. The fight over feminism is one of the only anti-PC fights. Comprehensive coverage of contemporary sexuality, therefore, needs to cover a lot of ground, analyzing everything from Christianity to cyberspace.

Her address usually contains some standard Bright-isms, as well as some fresh takes on the hot sex topic of the day. At Wellesley, the topic--repression of sexual speech--was handed to her in the form of a bomb scare. She fields the mundane and the taboo with equal felicity. Her answers: There are a few excellent videos on female ejaculation.

Even her Macintosh is programmed to moan sensuously. Rape fantasies? Does craving penetration make a lesbian a traitor? Her green eyes are almost always concealed by librarianesque horn-rimmed glasses and her extensive sexual resume is delivered in a voice with a wholesome Middle-American ring to it.

At this distance, her lack of inhibition becomes contagious. Even the Wellesley campus police officer who sat with her during the bomb scare, Bright says, asked her about some of his own sexual concerns. Susie is able to say it in a way that people can understand it, and it makes them feel comfortable. I might describe how it feels or why it feels good.

But they see me talking about it like a really fun social science teacher. And Bright has attracted no shortage of mainstream types. It widens your world a little bit. Her activist membership was confirmed in , when she was a student at West L.

She filed a lawsuit that pitted the Red Tide, a Marxist-revolutionary newspaper, against the L. Unified School District, which had tried to prevent distribution of the paper citywide. By that time, however, Bright had moved to the Midwest to start a Red Tide among the Detroit urban poor and leap full time into socialist politics and organizing. Being openly bisexual in an extremely politicized lesbian culture, she says, made her a sexual outlaw two times over. Her voice rises and falls in a kind of singsong sarcasm.

We talk about peace and environmentalism. Then I bring you to an orgasm, you bring me to an orgasm simultaneously. And it was on and on and on, a very unrealistic idea of how to relate sexually. At age ten, her daughter Aretha was assigned a school report on what her parents did for a living. She was embarrassed to reveal to her class that her mom wrote about sex.

As Bright recalls:. In truth, I had been waiting for my daughter to come to me with this problem since I first became pregnant. We first spoke by phone in January, but the bulk of the condensed interview that appears here took place via email, right after a presidential candidate had made some strong pronouncements about sex and society.

TW : Has it always been political for a woman to write about sex? Or does it just feel that way right now? SB: Always. SB: Because of capitalist property relations. SB: The absurd anti-Obama campaign. TW : In Girl Land , Caitlin Flanagan argues that girls used to have a real girlhood rather than the sexualized childhood of today.

Do you have any memory of this golden girlhood? Lucky girls in the U. That now appears to have been a golden moment, rather than an enduring change. It did change pop culture; it changed personal lives. But the backlash has been severe. Children everywhere, and girls everywhere, have been exploited and bamboozled according to the times they lived in. TW : Is it risky to write about sex?

Do you think it has affected the way you are perceived in the literary world?