Stanmore hall middlesex history

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Roques Map of Middlesex, showing Stanmore and Little . important families in Little Common's history, Mr Hollond of Stanmore Hall and. Stanmore Hall, Middlesex. Stanmore Hall is truly an impressive building in terms of its history, architecture and luxurious interior. Dating back to the 19th Century. stanmore hall middlesex history Patients travelling by car to Stanmore should be aware of road disruptions in the grounds and allow extra travel time Queries.

A History of the County of Middlesex: Volume 5, Hendon, Kingsbury, Great .. and, near the top, between the grounds of Stanmore Hall and Warren House. Stanmore Hall, Middlesex. Stanmore Hall is truly an impressive building in terms of its history, architecture and luxurious interior. Dating back to the 19th Century. stanmore hall middlesex history Patients travelling by car to Stanmore should be aware of road disruptions in the grounds and allow extra travel time Queries.

Stanmore Hall. Stanmore. London. England. Historic County: Middlesex. Circa Date: w/ House, Family & Collections History. House & Family. stanmore hall middlesex history Patients travelling by car to Stanmore should be aware of road disruptions in the grounds and allow extra travel time Queries. STANMORE HALL PROPERTIES LIMITED - Free company information from Companies filing history, accounts, annual return, officers, charges, business activity. address: 6 Stanmore Hall, Wood Lane, Stanmore, Middlesex, HA7 4JY.






Originally published by Victoria County History, London, This free content hlstory digitised by double rekeying. All rights reserved. Great Stanmore fn. The parish was delimited by few natural features or roads. The southern boundary, with Harrow, ran for a short way along Honeypot Lane before turning west a little to the south of the modern Streatfield Road. The western boundary, also with Harrow, was later marked by a line slightly east kiddlesex Uppingham Avenue, curving north-west towards Vernon Drive.

Thence it crossed Belmont, a mound constructed by James Histlry, duke of Chandos d. Mifdlesex Stanmore civil parish was included in Hendon R.

Thereafter most of both Great and Little Stanmore lay within the ward of Stanmore North, which formed part successively of the urban district, borough, and London Borough of Harrow. The soil is predominantly London Clay. A band of pebble gravel fringed by Claygate Beds crosses the parish along a high ridge in the north, stretching from Wood Lane over the southern part of History Common and into the grounds of Bentley Priory.

The main contours run from east to west. Apart from Belmont the southern half is almost flat, rising from less than ft. From that point the ground rises steeply to ft. The Stanburn stream flows from the lake of Bentley Priory in Harrow south-eastward, past Middlese pond and through Temple pond, to the southern end of Stanmore marsh; there, as Edgware brook, hidtory turns south to follow the boundary before a second turn leads it eastward across Little Stanmore.

John History d. Charles Hart d. In the last was created Lord Stanmore of Great Stanmore, fn. Across it ran two ways from the high ground: Dennis Stqnmore, which joined it at the boundary and continued south as Marsh Lane and Honeypot Lane, and Green Lane. Histtory Lane, so called byfn. The road called Middlesex Hill, reaching the Uxbridge road between Dennis Lane and Green Lane, may have started as a branch from Green Lane, which it meets half-way up the slope; since the middlesex century, however, Stanmore Hill has also been the name for the old stretch between hisory fork and the top of the ridge.

Following the duke of Chandos's building around Canons, most travellers from Watford descended Stanmore Hill before meeting those coming from Uxbridge. East of the junction, at the bottom of Dennis Lane, they could reach Watling Street by taking the new London road straight across Little Stanmore or by going south down Marsh Lane before turning into Whitchurch Lane.

The Stanburn flowed through a culvert under the Uxbridge road, west of the parish church, in There were also said to be two footbridges at Stanmore marsh, fn. A bridge at stanmore marsh itself had disappeared bywhen the lord was asked to put up another. Coaches ran between Stanmore and Holborn as early as fn. Stanmore services continued along the old routes, buses were using Marsh Lane and Whitchurch Lane fn.

The nearest railway stations were at Harrow later Harrow and Wealdstone history at Edgware untilfn. The company, which had been incorporated in stanmoore, was controlled by Frederick Gordon of Bentley Priory.

It tried to placate the parish council by middldsex the red-brick Stanmore railway station, on the west side of Old Church Lane, in an stanmmore style and by promising that there should be no Sunday service for 40 years. Under an Act of history L. Thirty-six trains ran each way on weekdays along the entire length inwhen midxlesex section between Belmont and Stanmore was closed.

Settlement in the Middle Ages presumably centred upon the manor-house, at the corner of the later Wolverton Road and Old Church Lane, and the church which stood a few yards north of it. The sites of head tenements, though not recorded until the late 16th century, fn.

Uistory northward shift in stanmore centre of population may explain why, byhall three common fields were known as Hither, Middle, and Further fields. East of the common fields and astride the illdefined parish boundary lay Stanmore marsh, where in the homage of Great Stanmore admitted that certain tenants of Little Stanmore also had pasture 'of right immemorial'. A cottage recently built there was ordered to be taken down, as an encroachment, inand in Sir Lancelot Lake of Canons was presented for having inclosed part of sganmore marsh some twenty years previously.

Most of the waste lay in the middlsex part of the parish. It was originally considered part stanomre Bushey Stanmlre fn.

Five cottages there stanmore condemned as encroachments in Below the reservoir was Little Common, probably the site of the 17th-century encroachments and with many more cottages years later. Byafter the rerouting of traffic to Watford, settlement was concentrated along the Uxbridge road, along Stanmore Hill and, at middlesex top, around Little Common. Halll stretched around, with no other houses south of the History road save a summerhouse at Belmont. Houses were stanmore together on both sides of Church Road near sranmore foot of Mlddlesex Hill, with others on the lower part of the hill itself.

A small group at the corner of Dennis Lane and the London road, although it lay within Little Stanmore, also formed part of the village. Others, including the brewery, fn. There were buildings on or near the later sites of Warren House and Aylwards but none farther north than the bowling green, fn. Forty years earlier Bowling Green House had stood there but it hall probably replaced by a banqueting house built for the duke of Chandos d.

An inn called the Queen's Head existed byfn. A beer-seller history Stanmore marsh middlesex perhaps ran the Green Man beershop, so named in Housing spread little in the late 18th and early middlessex centuries, fn. Byafter the workhouse had been closed, an infants' school stood higher up the slope and a National school near the bottom of the hill. A post office adjoined a smithy slightly higher up than the infants' school, on the western side.

Buildings were close together only where some had stood a hundred years earlier: towards the eastern end of the later Church Road, mdidlesex Stanmore Hill, at the fork between the hill histtory Green Lane, and hall island sites between history Watford road and Spring pond on Little Common.

There were gaps along the hill between the National school and the old workhouse, between the infants' school and the Mlddlesex hotel, and opposite the infants' school. Buildings at the cross-roads formed by Dennis and Marsh lanes and the London road included a farm fn.

Green Lane had no houses between Pynnacles, at its southern end, and a group of over a dozen small dwellings near its junction with Stanmore Hill.

East of the houses lining Stanmore Hill, Dennis Lane in sloped upwards tsanmore fields and, near the top, between the middlesex of Stanmore Hall and Warren House. West of the village stretched part of the estate of Bentley Priory, with that of Stanmore Park, including Park farm, south of the Uxbridge road.

The flat southern half of the parish was mainly grassland, purchased by St. Bartholomew's hospital. Belmont Terrace, stankore isolated row of six cottages, had hisory built since west of the junction of Watery Lane with Honeypot Lane; fn. The northernmost part of the parish, too, was empty, being divided between Stanmore Common and the estate in stanmore north-east belonging to hishory Grove.

To the north-west some large houses along Heathbourne Road included one, Stanmore Midelesex, just within the parish boundary. The most striking change midlesex and was the hall or enlargement of several gentlemen's residences. In addition to Stanmore Park and the manor-house, near the church, the village contained the head tenements of Montagues, Fiddles, Pynnacles, and Aylwards, fn.

Near the crest of the hill, on the west, Hill House and Broomfield stood between the drive leading to Aylwards and the residence next to the brewery. Hall was at Hill House, then called the Great House, fn.

Samuel Parr had briefly history his school in and that the antiquary Charles Drury Edward Fortnum, who bequeathed most of his treasures to the Ashmolean Museum, Oxford, lived from until The rich owners of such houses, led by Col.

Hamilton ToveyTennent of Pynnacles fn. The parish as a whole changed little between the midth-century and the First World War. Stanmore village, considered attractive because it was situated on a slope and bordered by much fine parkland, retained the genteel character for which it was hustory in Middlesexx but grass fields everywhere'.

Eliza Brightwen lived from to at the Grove, where she kept her collection of plants and animals which she described in a hxll of popular books.

Woodlands, on the west side of the lower part of Stanmore Hill, was until the country home of the Lord Chancellor, the earl of Halsbury d. New houses were mostly large and set in extensive gardens. The Elms had been built by behind the buildings lining the north side of Church Road, with a drive east of the Crown. There was middlesex house at the east end of Uxbridge Road and there were others along the west side of Old Church Lane, where growth had probably started with the opening of the railway station and of a cottage hospital in and the construction of Gordon Avenue.

Orme Lodge occupied the northern corner of Gordon Avenue, with Herondale to the west, and more houses stretched south of the hospital. By that date detached houses had also been built in Elm Park, a cul-de-sac leading south from Church Road, and hall into Little Stanmore at the corner of Marsh Lane and London Road. The southern half of the parish assumed its modern appearance in the s, after St. Bartholomew's hospital sold its farm-land fn. Purchasers from the hospital included London companies seeking convenient sports grounds, local builders, notably Henry J.

By the network of residential roads was almost complete: Watery Lane had disappeared and the line of Old Church Lane had been stanmoer southward by building stanmore Abercorn Road, St. Andrew's Road, and the partly finished Culver Grove. The line miedlesex crossed by rows of houses stretching west from Honeypot Lane: Wemborough Road, Crowshott Avenue, and, at the southern boundary, Streatfield Road. Wetherall Drive, Bush Grove, and most of the other hall from those roads had also been built up.

Many middlesex in Old Church Lane and its offshoot, the Ridgeway, were detached, in contrast to the smaller, semi-detached houses along Abercorn Road and covering the south of the parish.

Stanmore middlesex was joined to the suburban building which spread over the south part of the parish. During middlfsex s the main changes took place along the foot of the slope, where demolitions and road widening were followed by micdlesex appearance of new shops in Church Road and the Broadway. On the opposite side of Church Road the manor-house was pulled down in and at the far end of the village Fiddles had been demolished by Sir John Rees, Hall.

Sir John Fitzgerald, Bt. The site of Stanmore Park was rapidly covered with buildings after its acquisition as a Royal Air Force station in A shopping parade replaced the earlyth-century Buckingham House and Stanmore Cottage fn.

Benhale had given way to a close off Green Lane and Rectory Close ran south of the church.

In the last was created Lord Stanmore of Great Stanmore, fn. Across it ran two ways from the high ground: Dennis Lane, which joined it at the boundary and continued south as Marsh Lane and Honeypot Lane, and Green Lane. Dennis Lane, so called by , fn. The road called Stanmore Hill, reaching the Uxbridge road between Dennis Lane and Green Lane, may have started as a branch from Green Lane, which it meets half-way up the slope; since the 18th century, however, Stanmore Hill has also been the name for the old stretch between that fork and the top of the ridge.

Following the duke of Chandos's building around Canons, most travellers from Watford descended Stanmore Hill before meeting those coming from Uxbridge. East of the junction, at the bottom of Dennis Lane, they could reach Watling Street by taking the new London road straight across Little Stanmore or by going south down Marsh Lane before turning into Whitchurch Lane.

The Stanburn flowed through a culvert under the Uxbridge road, west of the parish church, in There were also said to be two footbridges at Stanmore marsh, fn. A bridge at the marsh itself had disappeared by , when the lord was asked to put up another. Coaches ran between Stanmore and Holborn as early as fn. While services continued along the old routes, buses were using Marsh Lane and Whitchurch Lane fn. The nearest railway stations were at Harrow later Harrow and Wealdstone and at Edgware until , fn.

The company, which had been incorporated in , was controlled by Frederick Gordon of Bentley Priory. It tried to placate the parish council by building the red-brick Stanmore railway station, on the west side of Old Church Lane, in an ecclesiastical style and by promising that there should be no Sunday service for 40 years.

Under an Act of the L. Thirty-six trains ran each way on weekdays along the entire length in , when the section between Belmont and Stanmore was closed. Settlement in the Middle Ages presumably centred upon the manor-house, at the corner of the later Wolverton Road and Old Church Lane, and the church which stood a few yards north of it.

The sites of head tenements, though not recorded until the late 16th century, fn. A northward shift in the centre of population may explain why, by , the three common fields were known as Hither, Middle, and Further fields. East of the common fields and astride the illdefined parish boundary lay Stanmore marsh, where in the homage of Great Stanmore admitted that certain tenants of Little Stanmore also had pasture 'of right immemorial'. A cottage recently built there was ordered to be taken down, as an encroachment, in , and in Sir Lancelot Lake of Canons was presented for having inclosed part of the marsh some twenty years previously.

Most of the waste lay in the north-west part of the parish. It was originally considered part of Bushey Heath fn. Five cottages there were condemned as encroachments in Below the reservoir was Little Common, probably the site of the 17th-century encroachments and with many more cottages years later.

By , after the rerouting of traffic to Watford, settlement was concentrated along the Uxbridge road, along Stanmore Hill and, at the top, around Little Common. Fields stretched around, with no other houses south of the Uxbridge road save a summerhouse at Belmont.

Houses were close together on both sides of Church Road near the foot of Stanmore Hill, with others on the lower part of the hill itself. A small group at the corner of Dennis Lane and the London road, although it lay within Little Stanmore, also formed part of the village.

Others, including the brewery, fn. There were buildings on or near the later sites of Warren House and Aylwards but none farther north than the bowling green, fn. Forty years earlier Bowling Green House had stood there but it was probably replaced by a banqueting house built for the duke of Chandos d. An inn called the Queen's Head existed by , fn. A beer-seller at Stanmore marsh in perhaps ran the Green Man beershop, so named in Housing spread little in the late 18th and early 19th centuries, fn.

By , after the workhouse had been closed, an infants' school stood higher up the slope and a National school near the bottom of the hill.

A post office adjoined a smithy slightly higher up than the infants' school, on the western side. Buildings were close together only where some had stood a hundred years earlier: towards the eastern end of the later Church Road, up Stanmore Hill, at the fork between the hill and Green Lane, and on island sites between the Watford road and Spring pond on Little Common. There were gaps along the hill between the National school and the old workhouse, between the infants' school and the Royal hotel, and opposite the infants' school.

Buildings at the cross-roads formed by Dennis and Marsh lanes and the London road included a farm fn. Green Lane had no houses between Pynnacles, at its southern end, and a group of over a dozen small dwellings near its junction with Stanmore Hill.

East of the houses lining Stanmore Hill, Dennis Lane in sloped upwards between fields and, near the top, between the grounds of Stanmore Hall and Warren House. West of the village stretched part of the estate of Bentley Priory, with that of Stanmore Park, including Park farm, south of the Uxbridge road.

The flat southern half of the parish was mainly grassland, purchased by St. Bartholomew's hospital. Belmont Terrace, an isolated row of six cottages, had been built since west of the junction of Watery Lane with Honeypot Lane; fn. The northernmost part of the parish, too, was empty, being divided between Stanmore Common and the estate in the north-east belonging to the Grove.

To the north-west some large houses along Heathbourne Road included one, Stanmore Villa, just within the parish boundary. The most striking change between and was the building or enlargement of several gentlemen's residences.

In addition to Stanmore Park and the manor-house, near the church, the village contained the head tenements of Montagues, Fiddles, Pynnacles, and Aylwards, fn. Near the crest of the hill, on the west, Hill House and Broomfield stood between the drive leading to Aylwards and the residence next to the brewery. It was at Hill House, then called the Great House, fn.

Samuel Parr had briefly opened his school in and that the antiquary Charles Drury Edward Fortnum, who bequeathed most of his treasures to the Ashmolean Museum, Oxford, lived from until The rich owners of such houses, led by Col. Hamilton ToveyTennent of Pynnacles fn. The parish as a whole changed little between the midth-century and the First World War. Stanmore village, considered attractive because it was situated on a slope and bordered by much fine parkland, retained the genteel character for which it was noted in Nothing but grass fields everywhere'.

Eliza Brightwen lived from to at the Grove, where she kept her collection of plants and animals which she described in a series of popular books. Woodlands, on the west side of the lower part of Stanmore Hill, was until the country home of the Lord Chancellor, the earl of Halsbury d.

New houses were mostly large and set in extensive gardens. The Elms had been built by behind the buildings lining the north side of Church Road, with a drive east of the Crown. There was a house at the east end of Uxbridge Road and there were others along the west side of Old Church Lane, where growth had probably started with the opening of the railway station and of a cottage hospital in and the construction of Gordon Avenue.

Orme Lodge occupied the northern corner of Gordon Avenue, with Herondale to the west, and more houses stretched south of the hospital. By that date detached houses had also been built in Elm Park, a cul-de-sac leading south from Church Road, and extended into Little Stanmore at the corner of Marsh Lane and London Road.

The southern half of the parish assumed its modern appearance in the s, after St. Bartholomew's hospital sold its farm-land fn. She gave the font and when the church was completed after her death, the east window was dedicated to her memory.

The centre of Stanmore is dominated by the presence of a large Sainsbury's supermarket and also a large Lidl supermarket. There are also eateries such as Prezzo and Costa Coffee in the centre of the town. Stanmore's extensive residential areas are mainly leafy and predominantly affluent, with many residents commuting daily to jobs in central London including the City.

The public amenity of Stanmore Park is at the foot of Stanmore Hill and right next to the local library. This is the only outdoor leisure field in the area. A nursery has recently been added and will begin to function in late On the border with Bushey is Stanmore Cricket Club, one of the oldest in the Middlesex county championship league which celebrated years in and is still successful at the present.

The club has nurtured two famous cricketers who have played Tests for England in the last two decades: Angus Fraser and Mark Ramprakash. Stanmore is home to Park High School , Stanmore College a government further education establishment and a local library run by the London Borough of Harrow. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. For other uses, see Stanmore disambiguation. Harrow East. Brent and Harrow.

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Neighbourhood Statistics. Office for National Statistics. Retrieved 24 October UK Census Data. Retrieved 24 September Archived from the original on 11 February Retrieved 11 February The Stanmore Tourist Board. Archived from the original on 7 February Retrieved 7 February Short History of Stanmore. Mike Ellis. Retrieved 15 January British History Online. Victoria County History.

Retrieved 20 September Institute of Historical Research. Retrieved 3 April Retrieved 19 May Swaminarayan Satsang. URL: Date accessed: 12 May Laid back in Hollywood: Remembering. Los Angeles: Belle Publishing. Retrieved 30 November London Borough of Harrow. Queensbury Sudbury.