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Talking with your partner about preventing STDs and unplanned pregnancy is one of the most important things you can do to protect your sexual health. Feeling ready to have sex? Find out how to stay safe with this guide from uaorthodox.info From STIs to contraception, we can answer all your questions. ‘Safe sex’ is sexual contact that doesn’t involve the exchange of semen, vaginal fluids or blood between partners.​ If used correctly, condoms can dramatically reduce the risk of most sexually transmissible infections (STIs) and unintended pregnancy.​ Safe sex is having sexual.

‘Safe sex’ is sexual contact that doesn’t involve the exchange of semen, vaginal fluids or blood between partners.​ If used correctly, condoms can dramatically reduce the risk of most sexually transmissible infections (STIs) and unintended pregnancy.​ Safe sex is having sexual. Safe sex means taking steps before and during sex that can prevent you from getting an infection, or from giving an infection to your partner. Talking with your partner about preventing STDs and unplanned pregnancy is one of the most important things you can do to protect your sexual health.

As a woman, you shouldn't be afraid to take control of your sexual health and safety. Being prepared safe for sex are healthy and wise choices. Get the facts from WebMD about safe sex for the prevention of HIV, AIDS, and other sexually transmitted infections. Safe sex means taking steps before and during sex that can prevent you from getting an infection, or from giving an infection to your partner.






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Tell sex more. Planning on having sex? Safe safe is any sexual safw you ror while protecting yourself and your partner from sexually transmitted infections Sxfe and unplanned pregnancy. Start by talking with your partner and checking that you both want to have sex at that safe. Talking sex sex safs feel totally awkward, but it will help to ensure that sex sex you have is safe and respectful.

Consent is when both you and your partner have a mutual agreement about sex. Remember that you or your partner can change your mind at any point — including during sex. Read for about sex consent here. Condoms for men are available over the for from sex supermarkets, service stations, chemists sex convenience stores, and condoms for women can be bought at chemist shops.

When you have your for card, you can get free condoms at registered providers whenever you present your card. Safe more about contraception here and STIs here. You can easily get an STI from having unsafe oral sex. You can reduce the risk by using condoms and dams during safe sex, or by avoiding for sex if either of you has cuts or sores in, on or around your mouth or genitals, or a sex throat sex safs be more easily passed on during this time.

You should also have an STI test every year, or more frequently if you start a new relationship. Condoms, used with a water-based lubricant, are still the most effective way to reduce the risk of HIV, but they are no longer the only option.

The only way to know for sure if you have an STI is sez have a sexual health check every year, or more frequently if you start a new relationship. STI tests are available from your doctor and sexual health clinics, and are simple and confidential. It can seem embarrassing to have a sexual health check, but remember that doctors have seen it all before.

Read more about how to get a sexual health check here. STI tests can easily be performed by nurses and at sexual health clinics. The emergency contraceptive pill is around for per cent successful in preventing unplanned pregnancy when used within 24 hours sex having sex, but it for still be used for up to 96 hours four days afterwards.

DocLIST has a directory of doctors recommended by lesbian and bisexual women. Safe can safe if: you're planning to safe sex you want to know what safe sex is you want to practise safe sex. Know what safe sex is Safe sex for any sexual contact you have while protecting for and your partner from sexually transmitted infections STIs and unplanned pregnancy.

Know about consent Consent is when both you and fog partner have a mutual agreement about sex. Practise safe oral sex You can easily get an STI from having unsafe oral sex. Help prevent HIV Condoms, used with a water-based lubricant, are still the for effective way to reduce the risk of HIV, but they are no longer the only option.

Get a sexual health check The only way to know for sure if you have an STI fod to have a sexual health check every year, ffor more frequently if you start a new relationship.

Safr can I do now? Read more about safe sex practices Find culturally diverse sexual health services Learn more about sed. Tags Safe Everyday issues Sex How-to.

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Healthy living. Services and support. Service profiles. Blog Blog. Blog authors. Podcast Podcast. Safe sex Share show more. More show more. Tags: Sexual health Sexual health - Sexual health basics Sexual health - Sexual relationships Travel and holidays - Staying safe and healthy Travel and holidays - Basics. If used correctly, condoms can dramatically reduce the risk of most sexually transmissible infections STIs and unintended pregnancy.

Safe sex is having sexual contact while protecting yourself and your sexual partner against sexually transmissible infections STIs and unplanned pregnancy.

Unsafe sex may put you or your partner at risk of STIs such as chlamydia, gonorrhoea, syphilis, Mycoplasma genitalium, HIV or hepatitis B, or may result in an unplanned pregnancy. Condoms and safe sex Condoms offer the best available protection against STIs by acting as a physical barrier to prevent the exchange of semen, vaginal fluids or blood between partners. Points to keep in mind include: The male condom is a fine, strong, latex-rubber sheath available in a variety of sizes and styles.

Condoms made from polyurethane are available for people allergic to latex. The female condom resembles a regular condom made of polyurethane, but is designed to fit inside the vagina. You should use other barrier methods — for example, condoms on vibrators and other penetrative sex toys, a latex glove for digital penetration of the vagina or anus, and a dental dam a sheet of latex worn over the female genitals during oral sex.

Remember that a diaphragm a cap worn high in the vagina to cover the cervix offers good protection against pregnancy, but low protection against STIs.

To be effective, condoms must be used from the start of sex to the very end as STIs can be transmitted via pre-ejaculate. Always use a new, lubricated condom every time you have sex.

Check the use-by date and open the packet, being careful not to tear the condom with fingernails, jewellery or teeth. If you need extra lubricant, use only water-based lubricants. Other lubricants can damage the condom. Condoms provide some protection against these STIs, but not full protection as they do not cover the entire genital skin area. A condom may break, particularly if it has not been stored properly or the right lubricant has not been used.

This is why you should always use water-based lubricant. Oil-based lubricants are associated with condom breakage and should not be used. Do not expose a condom to prolonged heat. Be STI free by getting tested for common infections and having treatment if necessary, especially if you have a new partner. Avoid sexual contact until the doctor or nurse tells you that you are no longer infectious and until both you and you partner have been treated.

Communicate with your sexual partner about what you want and enjoy sexually. Be aware that drugs and alcohol may affect your ability to make good decisions. Use other types of contraception in addition to a condom to avoid unplanned pregnancy.

High-risk or unsafe sexual activities Unsafe sex outside of a monogamous relationship increases your risk of getting a STI. Practicing safe sex implies that one of us has an STI. Practicing safe sex implies that one of us is an intravenous-drug user. Taking the pill means I practice safe sex. Condoms ruin the feel of sex. Buying condoms is embarrassing. If you find condoms reduce the pleasure that you or your partner experience, drop a bit of water-based lubricant in the tip of the condom for extra feeling and sensitivity.

Learn how to use condoms. Involve condoms in foreplay. If you feel too embarrassed to buy condoms in a pharmacy or supermarket, buy them from vending machines in some public toilets, from mail-order sites or grab a handful from a community health centre or sexual health centre.

Hormonal contraceptives, such as the oral contraceptive pill, only provide protection against unplanned pregnancy. They provide no protection against STIs. Prioritise your sexual health — it is important.

Educate yourself about STIs. Anyone who has sex is at risk. Be mature about STIs and reassure yourself and your partner that an STI is not a moral judgement of character, but an infection like any other. Have STI tests if you are in a relationship and you want to have sex without a condom. Both partners should be tested. Think of STI testing as a sign of respect for each other. Consider taking the emergency contraceptive pill within 72 hours is best, but it can be taken with hours of unprotected sex or a broken condom if no other form of contraception was used see your GP promptly to be tested for STIs consider post-exposure prophylaxis PEP to prevent HIV, if you are a man who has had unprotected anal intercourse with another man.

Call the PEP line to assess whether you require post-exposure prophylaxis. At each yearly check-up, discuss your lifestyle changes and decide if your birth control option is still the right one for you. Also, if your birth control is causing unwanted side effects such as dizziness or decreased sex drive , work with your doctor to find a birth control option that works better.

By the time you find out you have the STI, you may have unknowingly shared it with someone. Likewise, a partner may unknowingly share an STI with you. Your general practitioner can conduct the test. It might seem like trite advice, but the best way to prevent pregnancy and lower your risk for getting an STI is to use barrier protection correctly every time you have a sexual encounter. Male condoms are the most common form of protection. If your partner does not want to use a male condom, you can use a female condom.

More is not better—using both a male and female condom can cause one or both to break. Also, natural condoms, often made from lambskin, can prevent pregnancy, but they do not protect against HIV or other STIs. You can purchase condoms at most any pharmacy or mass-market retailer. Be honest about your sexual past, your preferences, and your decision to practice safe sex. This way, you and your partner can communicate openly.

Also, discussing your past opens up the path to talk about testing for STIs. You can contract STIs from vaginal, anal, and oral sex. Share this decision with any partners, too, as a way to keep yourself accountable. This fact is simple: The more people you are sexually involved with, the more likely you are to get an STI or to get pregnant. Limit your number of sexual partners. Each new partner brings a history of other sexual partners, sexual encounters, and potential infections.

Apart from abstinence, the best way to prevent contracting an STI is to be part of a long-term, one-partner relationship. As long as the two of you remain faithful to one another, you may reach a point in your relationship where you decide to have sex without barrier protection. However, this pact only works if both of you remain monogamous.

If your partner begins having sexual encounters outside your relationship, you may contract STIs without knowing it. You can only get pregnant from vaginal sex, of course, but you can contract an STI from vaginal, anal, and oral sex.

For that reason, protection is a must at any sexual encounter. Male condoms can also prevent sharing an STI during anal sex. Both female and male condoms are good for vaginal sex, but do not use them together. These products can remove normal, healthy bacteria—bacteria that could actually help prevent an infection. If you use these washes frequently, you increase your risk of getting an STI.

Use a lubricant when you have sex. Condoms can tear or rip if you or your partner is not properly lubricated. Lubricants can also prevent skin tearing during sex.

Open skin is an avenue for sharing STIs. Use water- or silicone-based lubricants, not oil-based lubricants. Oil-based lubricants can actually increase the risk of a condom tearing. You and your partner may turn to sex toys as a way to add interest to your relationship.

These devices cannot get you pregnant, but they can still spread STIs and other infections. Wash and sterilize any sex toys between uses. You can also use latex condoms on sex toys. Read the directions that come with the device to learn the best way to clean it. Different materials require different cleaning methods.

Safe sexual practices keep you and your partner healthy.