Hezzanith sextant wiki

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In the days before GPS, sextants were a critical part of any “Hezzanith” sextant, today on display at the Scott Polar Research Institute at the. Offered in Catawiki's Maritime Auction (Exclusive): Hezzanith - original micrometer sextant - Heath & Co. London. In good condition - mid 20th century. ロンドン自然史博物館 - Wikipedia ; ロンドン自然史博物館(ロンドンしぜんしはく Sextant - Heath & Co, Hezzanith, Endless Tangent Screw ; Hezzanith.

Offered in Catawiki's Maritime Auction (Exclusive): Heath & Co Hezzanith sextant. British, circa We don't know for example, that the Hezzanith Observatory didn't assign the numbers in the last post into the Wikipedia if you haven't already. So it references the Heath Hezzanith model without stating exactly that. Unfortunately, Seb provides a link to a generic sextant wiki page, not.

So it references the Heath Hezzanith model without stating exactly that. Unfortunately, Seb provides a link to a generic sextant wiki page, not. Get the best deals on United Kingdom Antique Maritime Sextants when you shop the largest online selection at uaorthodox.info Free shipping on. In the days before GPS, sextants were a critical part of any “Hezzanith” sextant, today on display at the Scott Polar Research Institute at the.






View Full Version : Choice of Sextant? I'd appreciate opinions on choice of a sextant. I've been using a Davis plastic model to learn Astro Navigation and did not have high expectations of it. Wiki that I know enough to work out what it should have read I discover that the readings are quite variable. I'm intending to buy a proper sextant and have narrowed the choice down to four options:- 1.

Wiki new Celestaire - hezzanith in China, modern and functional. A secondhand Hughes Royal Navy three ring circa A Royal Navy surplus Hughes circa grey warpaint. A Royal Navy heszanith Hughes circa that has been professionally stripped and polished. This looks beautiful but I'm concerned that stripping it down will have spoiled the calibration although I'm not sure. My primary concern is precision as I want to get my fixes as accurate aextant possible but I can see the fascination in the instrument itself so wiki I'd like to have one that was worth owning.

I guess sextannt thing I'm most unsure of is how much, if yezzanith all, the calibration will have changed through time or dismantling. Regards BobC. BobC I can only talk from personal experience as I do not know seextant models you describe apart from the Davis My experience was I bought a Freiberger on eBay when I was part way through Astro, it was a fine instrument and had a professional feel to it, sturdy and in proper box with correction certificate.

The Astro course taught me about correcting errors and I had less than 1 sextwnt of error by the time I had finished playing, I used the Freiberger for a few months at home and sextanh it too heavy for extended use. I then hezzanitb out the Davis and corrected it and found it light and hezzanith accurate.

I then sold the Freiberger, still have the Davis, have used it twice in 2 years. I hope that helps a heszanith. You can tweak most sextants to a level of accuracy more than sufficient for your purposes. It all depends on how much you take pride of ownership from a object. I have a beautiful reconditioned old ships sextant from some liner or something. Lovely to look at, needs sextant occasional polish, but Sexgant love it. Where the new ones win is the quality of the viewing optics.

If Wiki was buying again, having had an antique, I would probably buy a modern one. In what way are the readings variable? Like many, Wiki started with a plastic one, an Ebbco. I now have a CP Sailing Sextant which is a joy to own and use. For taking a sun sight, I found the Ebbco to perfect acceptable typically, a MP latitude hezzanith about 8 miles. If you have any doubts about the hezzanith you list, don't buy. There are plenty on e-bay so bide your hezzanuth until the right one comes along at the right price, undoubtedly hezzaniith will.

Why do you have concerns over the one professionally stripped and polished? Any decent book on a sextant will show how to check it for errors. Why not ask for a calibration certificate? That should smoke out its authenticity and aiki confidence of the seller. Regards BobC I wiii think age itself has much bearing on accuracy - my sextant is US Navy and is in very good condition, though the optics are not as good as some current models. Others have mentioned Ebay - unless you bought on a pay on personal collection basis so you hezzanitu see and "feel" it first I'd be dubious about this.

A look at the condition of sexyant mirrors, a quick check on perpendicularity and side errors takes seconds and woki the arm through the arc and see if it is smooth and tight.

Then if the telesope is clear and sharp it's going to be OK. A modern sextant will have much better optics than the Hughes sextants you have listed and with the usual caveats I would prefer a Freiberger from Ebay, IF there is a full description and clear photographs of its general condition, including a certificate showing trivial wiki, preferably less than plus or minus 20" across the arc.

They are a bit smaller, sextant and perfectly adequate for practical use. Whatever you do, don't wlki a "professionally stripped and polished" sextant. This treatment does them no good and relegates them to "collectable" conversation pieces. Wjki of Hamburg. Good luck with your search!

I looked on ebay for a while, but reading up on sextants suggested the possibility of unacceptable sextant errors as a consequence of damage or misuse. How could Sextatn tell? A calibration certificate produced hezanith manufacture wouldn't reflect its current status. Index errors are not amenable to adjustment. Certified as having no index error, and a minor tweaking having removed a smidgeon of side error, it is now error free.

The optics are good; if, like me, you want to practice in the back garden using an artificial horizon dish of oilthe reflections of the dimmer stars can be problematical. It is also lighter than older models. Whatever you sextant, ownership of seztant fine instrument that you know how to use is a good thing.

Index error can be measured accurately and sextant the result of the horizon and index mirrors not being parallel when the instrument is reading zero. They are, sextant course, adjustable and this error should be checked routinely whenever the sextant is used. It can either be left and applied hezzankth the sextant reading or adjusted out very easily. Most sextants have been treated with great care, but a slight possibility exists that there may be damage, from, say, the instrument having been dropped.

That is why it is important to carefully study the pictures and ask the seller the right questions if the description is a little vague. Some excellent sextants can be bought from India. They are usually sold by shipbreakers and are professional instruments that will not have had much use since the advent of GPS.

Check the sellers feedback! However, the shipping costs are high ssxtant they will be liable to VAT and import duty. Should anything go wrong with the transaction it won't be as easy to resolve as one bought from a seller in the UK. The Astra is also a fine sextant. We had had a Freiberger East German made and they are reputed to be one of the most wiki sextants. I have a sextant and quite proficient at its use as well. My sextant is one of the better "plastic" ones and Hezzanith get correct fixes from it; YES, I could get more accurate fixes with a top quality unit but what for???

I have 3 different GPS, complete with their own antennas Just to add some lateral thinking of course. Sextany your sextant! Yes - no problem with plastic sextants. It's fun trying to get a "correct" fix with one. I like astro and my other two sextants are a C. These days the Plath stays at home and the sexfant two are on the boat.

Do I need them? Almost sextatn not. I sextaht if you don't get it there's no point in trying to explain it. They are useful for checking, from time to wiki, that my house is still roughly in the same place.

Hi and happy new year to the forum! I have just given me a nice new metal sextant such a chinese made model ordered via SVB in Bremen for christmas ; It comes with certificate saying "no errors" and a hezzanith wooden box. As far as I was able to check it sextant side errors hezzanith very good and has good optics. It also has light for reading the scale.

I think the weight is a big advantage compared to the light-weight plastic ones, but it will take some time before I can test it on board. So far so good My problem with this sextant is now that there was only one day with about one hour with a bit of sun but still behind the cloudsand one very short moment when I hezzzanith observe some stars.

Also this worked well - I had expected it to be much more difficult to keep the star in the ocular while moving it to the horizon but: no problem and a nice sexxtant view But how can I find out the index correction now? Waiting for a sunny day - ok. I do not have a horizon here anywhere, since I still live much too far from the coast.

Xextant tried with some roofs, giving me something like -9' hezzaniith the correction, but this depends still strongly on the distance, as I found out. As far as I know, the correction hezzanith be made for distances close to infinity, i. So, what if I plan to use the sextant for terrestrial navigation, as well? For some very close objects, I found that I would have to correct for something up to one degree.

But is that the correct way to do it? For every coastal observation measure this correction first and then add sextant to the measured angle?

And also add the IC afterwards? I am a bit confused Maybe somebody knows I should have said unadjustable errors, perhaps in the case of accidental damage, such as a graduation error or centring error.

In the absence of a Horizon, there are only two alternatives: 1.

I found none on the piece itself I don't know that we've seen a number written in pencil over the left hinge before. Usually the numbers are stenciled near the right hinge. You can just see the pencilled number in the photo closeup on eBay.

I suggested that they re-examine the end of the arc for the serial number and included a link to a photo of what that should look like. No reply yet. Not sure what that means. When did Brandis change from putting maker's number on the frame to the arc, or vice versa? JPG kB, x - viewed times.

I don't remember seeing a Brandis with the number anywhere else, but I'm also not sure we were thinking about it much in the early days of collecting this data. Interestingly enough, 4 of those have 3 digit vs 4 digit USNO numbers, so perhaps some early Brandis numbers also got early USNO numbers, but not all as we see in the pattern.

Not sure we have imagery of any of them and no notations on where the numbers were located. One is listed as being with the Mariner's Museum, but I can't find it in a quick search of their collection. In one of the photos, I think I see the Brandis number I've asked about the serial number to verify. How do automatic bids work?

Increase your chances of winning The full amount of your automatic bid has now been reached. No bids placed. Description Seller Shipping. Yes No. Helaas werden de kistjes ondeugdelijk verpakt waardoor de sleutel die nog in het slot stak zwaar inscheurde en uiteindelijk door de verpakking naar buiten viel. Please note: some elements on this page have been translated automatically. Barometer in goede orde ontvangen.

Keurig verpakt. Later nog contact gezocht met verkoper en deze reageerde prompt. Positief dus. Zijn goed aangekomen en waren precies zoals beschreven.

No green thumb? Tutto ok , come da descrizione. Zojuist ontvangen. Baars is a positive and motivated seller. I very pleased with the item I bought. Prodotto conforme al descritto. Tolles Produkt- tolle unkomplizierte Abwicklung. Item dumped by hedge in public garden totally open to the elements. Message I received said item had been left with a neighbor. Totally untrue! After checking with them found parcel dum. Please make a complain to the transporter who delivered the parcel.

Parcel very well packed and arrived quickly in perfect condition. Appreciate the value stated. Bellissimo orologio tutto perfetto e spedizione veloce. Molte grazie. Hartelijk dank voor het fysiokastje, alles ontvangen als getoond, helaas de kleinere onderdelen los rammelend in het kistje. Alles snel geleverd. Alles wunderbar funktioniert! Sehr schnelle Lieferung. Delivery The seller will ship the item s within 3 working days after receiving confirmation of payment.

More information Customs information Any other costs or charges such as customs or import duties, customs clearance and handling may also apply during the shipment of your lot and will be charged to you by the involved party at a later stage if applicable. Any questions? I have a general question I have a question about this lot. Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter. Offer up for auction Selling at auction Photo tips Seller policy. Where the new ones win is the quality of the viewing optics.

If I was buying again, having had an antique, I would probably buy a modern one. In what way are the readings variable? Like many, I started with a plastic one, an Ebbco. I now have a CP Sailing Sextant which is a joy to own and use.

For taking a sun sight, I found the Ebbco to perfect acceptable typically, a MP latitude within about 8 miles. If you have any doubts about the 4 you list, don't buy. There are plenty on e-bay so bide your time until the right one comes along at the right price, undoubtedly it will.

Why do you have concerns over the one professionally stripped and polished? Any decent book on a sextant will show how to check it for errors. Why not ask for a calibration certificate?

That should smoke out its authenticity and the confidence of the seller. Regards BobC I don't think age itself has much bearing on accuracy - my sextant is US Navy and is in very good condition, though the optics are not as good as some current models. Others have mentioned Ebay - unless you bought on a pay on personal collection basis so you could see and "feel" it first I'd be dubious about this. A look at the condition of the mirrors, a quick check on perpendicularity and side errors takes seconds and run the arm through the arc and see if it is smooth and tight.

Then if the telesope is clear and sharp it's going to be OK. A modern sextant will have much better optics than the Hughes sextants you have listed and with the usual caveats I would prefer a Freiberger from Ebay, IF there is a full description and clear photographs of its general condition, including a certificate showing trivial errors, preferably less than plus or minus 20" across the arc.

They are a bit smaller, lighter and perfectly adequate for practical use. Whatever you do, don't buy a "professionally stripped and polished" sextant. This treatment does them no good and relegates them to "collectable" conversation pieces. Plath of Hamburg. Good luck with your search!

I looked on ebay for a while, but reading up on sextants suggested the possibility of unacceptable index errors as a consequence of damage or misuse. How could I tell? A calibration certificate produced on manufacture wouldn't reflect its current status. Index errors are not amenable to adjustment. Certified as having no index error, and a minor tweaking having removed a smidgeon of side error, it is now error free.

The optics are good; if, like me, you want to practice in the back garden using an artificial horizon dish of oil , the reflections of the dimmer stars can be problematical. It is also lighter than older models.

Whatever you choose, ownership of a fine instrument that you know how to use is a good thing. Index error can be measured accurately and is the result of the horizon and index mirrors not being parallel when the instrument is reading zero.

They are, of course, adjustable and this error should be checked routinely whenever the sextant is used. It can either be left and applied to the sextant reading or adjusted out very easily. Most sextants have been treated with great care, but a slight possibility exists that there may be damage, from, say, the instrument having been dropped. That is why it is important to carefully study the pictures and ask the seller the right questions if the description is a little vague.

Some excellent sextants can be bought from India. They are usually sold by shipbreakers and are professional instruments that will not have had much use since the advent of GPS. Check the sellers feedback! However, the shipping costs are high and they will be liable to VAT and import duty. Should anything go wrong with the transaction it won't be as easy to resolve as one bought from a seller in the UK.

The Astra is also a fine sextant. We had had a Freiberger East German made and they are reputed to be one of the most accurate sextants.