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Editions for Flux: Women on Sex, Work, Love, Kids, and Life in a Half-Changed World: X (Paperback published in ), (Hardcover. Context: In obesity, increases in free fatty acid (FFA) flux can predict In adolescents, it is unknown whether sex differences in FFA flux occur. Flux: Women on Sex, Work, Love, Kids and Life in a Half-Changed World. Peggy Orenstein, Author Doubleday Books $25 (p) ISBN

Flux: Women on Sex, Work, Love, Kids and Life in a Half-Changed World. Peggy Orenstein, Author Doubleday Books $25 (p) ISBN Editions for Flux: Women on Sex, Work, Love, Kids, and Life in a Half-Changed World: X (Paperback published in ), (Hardcover. In adolescents, it is unknown whether sex differences in FFA flux occur. OBJECTIVE: Our objective was to determine the associations of sex.

In adolescents, it is unknown whether sex differences in FFA flux occur. OBJECTIVE: Our objective was to determine the associations of sex. Context: In obesity, increases in free fatty acid (FFA) flux can predict In adolescents, it is unknown whether sex differences in FFA flux occur. Peggy Orenstein's bestselling Schoolgirls is the classic study of teenage girls and self-esteem. Now Orenstein uses the same interviewing and reporting skills to.






Peggy Orenstein's bestselling Schoolgirls is the classic study of teenage girls and self-esteem. Now Orenstein uses the same interviewing and reporting skills to examine the lives of women in their 20s, 30s and 40s. Sex advances of the women's movement allow women to grow up with a sense of expanded possibilities. Yet sex expectations have hardly changed. To discover sex they are navigating this double burden personally and professionally, Orenstein interviewed hundreds of women and has blended their voices into a compelling narrative that gets deep inside their lives and choices.

With unusual sensitivity, Orenstein offers insight and inspiration for every woman who is making important decisions of her own. Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required. Would you like to tell us about a lower price?

If you are a seller for this product, would you like to suggest updates through seller support? Read more Read less. Save Extra with 4 offers. Customers who bought this item also bought. Page 1 of 1 Start over Page 1 of 1. Peggy Orenstein. Sharon Hays. Rad Dad: Dispatches from the Frontiers of Fatherhood. Tomas Moniz. Liza Featherstone. Carrie N. See all Product description. To get the free app, enter mobile phone number. See all flux Kindle reading apps.

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Verified Purchase. This was a required read for my 50th reunion at Mt Holyoke College and we will be discussing it when I attend the reunion. It presents the various problems today's women encounter as they negotiate today's world. Do they marry early or late? When do they have children-if at all? How do husbands fit into the picture? How does one balance motherhood and career? Is a stay at home life the best option? The book presents the research of the author as she interviews women in the modern world.

Various women's lives and reflections on those lives are presented. It was not an exciting read but interesting. Since the days Sex Friedan spoke on our campus, women's options in life have changed a great deal. Since my class is in our retirement years and was on the cusp of this new age when at college, I am sex how these options affected my classmates. What I liked most was that the author didn't try to make this flux all things flux everything: she only interviewed women who she considers "Pace Setters:" university educated and white-collar.

Each woman flux a distinct story, unique goals and hurdles. But similar themes are heard time and time again. And by eloquantly telling us their own tales, they reveal to readers that there is no way to acheive a perfect balance. We are all just struggling to do the best we can.

Each of us bring to the books we read our own perspectives or backgrounds. Sex me I bring to the books I read flux background of being a working class kid who grew up and was lucky enough to get a first-class education and obtain a handful of degrees. I tell you this because I expected that I would love this book. I didn't. This book disturbed me on so many levels.

I finished it but it was hard going because it was just a bunch of self-indulgent women complaining about their lives and refusing flux do anything about it. The women who had chances, women who had husbands who were willing to help out with childcare, who had husbands who were willing to stay home, didn't let their husbands because they "could do it better".

My French husband heard a saying on an American show awhile back that he loves. I kept thinking of it while reading this sex world problems. This book talks about middle and upper middle class women and a few working class women who are working on achieving "the dream" of having it all and finding that they can't.

What about the millions of American working class women who don't have a choice? What about them? I know many who "have it all" because they have no choice. They have to work full-time while raising kids because their income is all they have. What about the working class women many I have personally met over the years at Universities across America who work full-time, raise kids AND go to school so that they can better their lives and that of their children?

This book is a self-indulgent rant by middle class women of how they want to be strong and in-control but then when they sex the career that they want they suddenly think it's too hard flux they just want to stay home and raise their kids.

The sex in the book want equality or so they say because I don't believe them but they HAVE to marry men who make more money than they do and then they throw away careers to stay home. Coming from my family background with a mother who worked full-time and took care of me all by herselfwhile I went to daycare and school, a mother who worked overtime every single Saturday of my childhood because we needed the money these women are a disgrace to the women's movement and women everywhere.

I have traveled to a lot of countries in my studies and work, I have met with and worked with women from every walk of life, their struggles and what they do everyday without complaint or without asking for pity is amazing. They are the ones that books should be written about, not these selfish mommies. We need to get rid of the perfect mom role the honestly flux women in this world don't care about being a perfect mother, they just want to raise happy kids and we need to get rid of all of these "rules" and let go and live our lives.

Flux one can tell you what you can or cannot have. At the end of it all it seemed that these women wanted was more and more money. They had to have the high-powered careers because that was the only marker of a successful life-money. They had to have husbands who had the same kind of jobs, who made more money. You are the one who lets others expectations control you.

Stop listening and in the end you'll be happy. This book is a well-written collection of interviews from women in various age groups with varying experiences. It was so refreshing to read stories that made you say "Hey, I'm not the only sex that feels that way! I flux purchased this book and recommended it to many friends.

If you're a woman - read this. At least now I know I'm not the only one who battles with these decisions. Sometimes we don't like to talk about the difficult subjects.

Have kids, yes or no? One person found this helpful. Go to Amazon. Back to top. Get to Know Us. English Choose a language for shopping. Audible Download Audio Books. DPReview Digital Photography. Shopbop Designer Fashion Brands. Amazon Prime Music Stream millions of songs, ad-free.

The advances of the women's movement allow women to grow up with a sense of expanded possibilities. Yet traditional expectations have hardly changed. To discover how they are navigating this double burden personally and professionally, Orenstein interviewed hundreds of women and has blended their voices into a compelling narrative that gets deep inside their lives and choices.

With unusual sensitivity, Orenstein offers insight and inspiration for every woman who is making important decisions of her own. Would you like to tell us about a lower price? If you are a seller for this product, would you like to suggest updates through seller support?

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Show details. Ships from and sold by Amazon. Customers who viewed this item also viewed. Page 1 of 1 Start over Page 1 of 1. Peggy Orenstein. Read more. Start reading Flux on your Kindle in under a minute. Don't have a Kindle? Customer reviews. Top Reviews Most recent Top Reviews. There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase. This was a required read for my 50th reunion at Mt Holyoke College and we will be discussing it when I attend the reunion. It presents the various problems today's women encounter as they negotiate today's world. Do they marry early or late? When do they have children-if at all?

How do husbands fit into the picture? How does one balance motherhood and career? Is a stay at home life the best option? The book presents the research of the author as she interviews women in the modern world.

Various women's lives and reflections on those lives are presented. It was not an exciting read but interesting. Since the days Betty Friedan spoke on our campus, women's options in life have changed a great deal. Since my class is in our retirement years and was on the cusp of this new age when at college, I am wondering how these options affected my classmates. Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase. What I liked most was that the author didn't try to make this book all things to everything: she only interviewed women who she considers "Pace Setters:" university educated and white-collar.

Each woman has a distinct story, unique goals and hurdles. But similar themes are heard time and time again.

And by eloquantly telling us their own tales, they reveal to readers that there is no way to acheive a perfect balance. We are all just struggling to do the best we can. Each of us bring to the books we read our own perspectives or backgrounds. For me I bring to the books I read a background of being a working class kid who grew up and was lucky enough to get a first-class education and obtain a handful of degrees. I tell you this because I expected that I would love this book.

I didn't. This book disturbed me on so many levels. I finished it but it was hard going because it was just a bunch of self-indulgent women complaining about their lives and refusing to do anything about it.

The women who had chances, women who had husbands who were willing to help out with childcare, who had husbands who were willing to stay home, didn't let their husbands because they "could do it better". My French husband heard a saying on an American show awhile back that he loves. I kept thinking of it while reading this book-"First world problems.

This book talks about middle and upper middle class women and a few working class women who are working on achieving "the dream" of having it all and finding that they can't. What about the millions of American working class women who don't have a choice? What about them? I know many who "have it all" because they have no choice.

They have to work full-time while raising kids because their income is all they have. What about the working class women many I have personally met over the years at Universities across America who work full-time, raise kids AND go to school so that they can better their lives and that of their children?

This book is a self-indulgent rant by middle class women of how they want to be strong and in-control but then when they get the career that they want they suddenly think it's too hard and they just want to stay home and raise their kids. The women in the book want equality or so they say because I don't believe them but they HAVE to marry men who make more money than they do and then they throw away careers to stay home.

And by eloquantly telling us their own tales, they reveal to readers that there is no way to acheive a perfect balance. We are all just struggling to do the best we can. Each of us bring to the books we read our own perspectives or backgrounds. For me I bring to the books I read a background of being a working class kid who grew up and was lucky enough to get a first-class education and obtain a handful of degrees.

I tell you this because I expected that I would love this book. I didn't. This book disturbed me on so many levels. I finished it but it was hard going because it was just a bunch of self-indulgent women complaining about their lives and refusing to do anything about it. The women who had chances, women who had husbands who were willing to help out with childcare, who had husbands who were willing to stay home, didn't let their husbands because they "could do it better".

My French husband heard a saying on an American show awhile back that he loves. I kept thinking of it while reading this book-"First world problems. This book talks about middle and upper middle class women and a few working class women who are working on achieving "the dream" of having it all and finding that they can't.

What about the millions of American working class women who don't have a choice? What about them? I know many who "have it all" because they have no choice.

They have to work full-time while raising kids because their income is all they have. What about the working class women many I have personally met over the years at Universities across America who work full-time, raise kids AND go to school so that they can better their lives and that of their children?

This book is a self-indulgent rant by middle class women of how they want to be strong and in-control but then when they get the career that they want they suddenly think it's too hard and they just want to stay home and raise their kids. The women in the book want equality or so they say because I don't believe them but they HAVE to marry men who make more money than they do and then they throw away careers to stay home.

Coming from my family background with a mother who worked full-time and took care of me all by herself , while I went to daycare and school, a mother who worked overtime every single Saturday of my childhood because we needed the money these women are a disgrace to the women's movement and women everywhere.

I have traveled to a lot of countries in my studies and work, I have met with and worked with women from every walk of life, their struggles and what they do everyday without complaint or without asking for pity is amazing. They are the ones that books should be written about, not these selfish mommies.

We need to get rid of the perfect mom role the honestly equal women in this world don't care about being a perfect mother, they just want to raise happy kids and we need to get rid of all of these "rules" and let go and live our lives. No one can tell you what you can or cannot have. At the end of it all it seemed that these women wanted was more and more money.

They had to have the high-powered careers because that was the only marker of a successful life-money. They had to have husbands who had the same kind of jobs, who made more money. You are the one who lets others expectations control you. Stop listening and in the end you'll be happy. This book is a well-written collection of interviews from women in various age groups with varying experiences.

It was so refreshing to read stories that made you say "Hey, I'm not the only one that feels that way! I have purchased this book and recommended it to many friends. If you're a woman - read this. At least now I know I'm not the only one who battles with these decisions. Sometimes we don't like to talk about the difficult subjects. Have kids, yes or no? One person found this helpful.

Go to Amazon. Back to top. Get to Know Us. English Choose a language for shopping. Audible Download Audio Books. DPReview Digital Photography. Shopbop Designer Fashion Brands. Amazon Prime Music Stream millions of songs, ad-free.