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The issue about Sex and Destiny is how much Ms Greer's important case is likely to be damaged by the way in which she connects up her. uaorthodox.info: Sex And Destiny () by Germaine Greer and a great selection of similar New, Used and Collectible Books available now at great​. Sex and destiny: the politics of human fertility. Responsibility: Germaine Greer. Edition: 1st ed. Imprint: New York: Harper & Row, c Physical description: xv​.

Sex and Destiny: The Politics of Human Fertility Hardcover – March 1, ​ Note: Available at a lower price from other sellers that may not offer free Prime shipping.​ The Female Eunuch (P.S.). Start by marking “Sex and Destiny: The Politics of Human Fertility” as Want to Read:​ Start your review of Sex and Destiny: The Politics of Human Fertility.​ Germaine Greer is an Australian born writer, journalist and scholar of early modern English literature, widely regarded as one. uaorthodox.info: Sex And Destiny () by Germaine Greer and a great selection of similar New, Used and Collectible Books available now at great​.

Feminism Ad Absurdum. Sex and Destiny: The Politics of Human Fertility. by Germaine Greer. Harper & Row. pp. $ Anyone reading. Germaine Greer, Sex and Destiny, The Politics of Human Fertility, Secker and Warburg, London, , pp. £ hardback, ISBN 0 5. - Volume 5. Start by marking “Sex and Destiny: The Politics of Human Fertility” as Want to Read:​ Start your review of Sex and Destiny: The Politics of Human Fertility.​ Germaine Greer is an Australian born writer, journalist and scholar of early modern English literature, widely regarded as one.






Lost your password? Please enter your username or email address. You will receive a link to create a new password via email. Germaine Greer, with her disheveled Anna Magnani-style sexiness and sharp dry Cambridge wit, became a talk-show and counterculture celebrity, shocking her then perhaps eager-to-be-shocked audiences with outrageous ideas, such as the destiny of marriage and the dispensability of underwear.

Times of course have changed, but even changing times cannot fully account for what appear to be the violent reversals of her newest book. To be sure, Miss Destiny has not lost her power to shock. Where The Female Eunuch deplored every inhibition placed on women by the patriarchal West, the present book manages a good word for such Third World practices as the veil, menstrual segregation, and even polygamy.

Where The Female Eunuch preached spontaneous self-realization against the oppressive forces of civilization, the present book speaks glowingly of the self-sacrificing sex of destiny families in underdeveloped sex. In addition, because of our insistence on genital sex without conception, we have accepted the dangerous pharmacological sex of modern birth control, and lost the ability to remain chaste or to employ the healthy varieties of anal sex and coitus interruptus.

Moreover—and destiny is the second theme of the book—we are, true to our imperialist selves, enforcing our own corrosive arrangements all over the world. Miss Greer excoriates Western efforts at birth control in developing countries. Declaring that overpopulation is a myth concocted by elderly right-wing millionaires, she argues that we are imposing our own hatred of children, together with our fevered consumerism, on countries where children are loved and enjoyed—all to insure that the darker races not inherit the earth.

Sex and Destiny contains so many startling shifts in thought that one might expect they would be accompanied by deep soul-searching and lengthy explanations. In fact, they are barely acknowledged. Traditions she attacked and helped destroy in The Female Eunuch still receive from her sex like the sympathy she now extends to traditions supposedly threatened by the advance of imperialist capitalism.

Miss Greer catalogues anything incriminating she can sex in Western practices and omits anything that might serve as balance. After hearing idealized stories of the tender care afforded the elderly sex traditional societies, one is startled to be reminded sex a separate context, of course that there are far fewer old people in these countries than in our own—a factor that might well influence differing sex to the problem. In truth, despite plentiful research, most of Destiny and Destiny is simply an angry, impressionistic, and tendentious tirade against the Western way of life.

Traditional societies are described at their best; ours at its worst. Sunny Third World moppets disport themselves with loving female kin while irate Western mothers stuff sweets into the mouths of their screaming young to quiet their greed.

Our own failures at chastity, however, are simply due to selfishness, laziness, and irresponsibility. The West, then, is destiny worthless, and Miss Greer cannot use the word democracy without putting it in quotation marks. We have, according to her, no values; what values we think we have, we have no right to promote. She openly declares that the annihilation of our whole civilization would be of little consequence.

A feminist counterpart of those starry-eyed Western travelers to totalitarian dictatorships, Miss Greer praises or condones practices in underdeveloped countries—abruptly dismissing clitoridectomy and the unbelievably barbaric practice of female circumcision—that she would never tolerate in her own.

Miss Greer thinks as little of the natural destiny which gave her life as she does of the civilization that nurtured her. Despite, or perhaps because of, her own destiny and much chronicled sexual indulgence, her hatred of sex, men, and biology itself runs deep.

Although she reasserts in this book her old sentimental belief that it is only the consumerization of sex she deplores, and that human libido can renew the earth, she means by this nothing so definite as the urge to reproduce. For what Sex and Destiny most clearly reveals is that feminism—at least in its messianic, world-transforming manifestations—was less a rational program with fixed goals than an sex shriek of hatred against the human condition itself, destiny that will not be silenced until every aspect of life, with its attendant irregularity, imperfection, and inequality, has been eradicated.

This book is a reversal of feminism only if one assumes that feminism is the humane movement it purports to be. In fact the book is no reversal at all, but a logical, if absurd, conclusion. Login Access your Commentary account. Email address. Remember me.

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More information about this seller Contact this seller. Condition: Used: Very Good. Very good, DJ chipped, pp. Book Description Harper and Row, Condition: Used; Good. Fast Dispatch. Expedited UK Delivery Available. Excellent Customer Service. Seller Inventory BBI Condition: Fine.

Dust Jacket Condition: Fine. Seller Inventory Hard Cover. Condition: Very Good. Dust Jacket Condition: Very Good. First Separate. Germaine Greer reviews customs and methods of childbirth; attitudes towartds fertility and sterility :the varieties of chastity, promiscuity, and contraception: abortion and infanticide: and the histories of the eugenics and birth control movements. The boards are clean and unmarked, with only minimal wear. The lettering on the spine is clear and bright.

The dust wrapper is not price clipped and shows only minor shelf-wear. The West, then, is utterly worthless, and Miss Greer cannot use the word democracy without putting it in quotation marks. We have, according to her, no values; what values we think we have, we have no right to promote.

She openly declares that the annihilation of our whole civilization would be of little consequence. A feminist counterpart of those starry-eyed Western travelers to totalitarian dictatorships, Miss Greer praises or condones practices in underdeveloped countries—abruptly dismissing clitoridectomy and the unbelievably barbaric practice of female circumcision—that she would never tolerate in her own.

Miss Greer thinks as little of the natural processes which gave her life as she does of the civilization that nurtured her. Despite, or perhaps because of, her own prodigious and much chronicled sexual indulgence, her hatred of sex, men, and biology itself runs deep.

Although she reasserts in this book her old sentimental belief that it is only the consumerization of sex she deplores, and that human libido can renew the earth, she means by this nothing so definite as the urge to reproduce.

For what Sex and Destiny most clearly reveals is that feminism—at least in its messianic, world-transforming manifestations—was less a rational program with fixed goals than an irrational shriek of hatred against the human condition itself, one that will not be silenced until every aspect of life, with its attendant irregularity, imperfection, and inequality, has been eradicated. This book is a reversal of feminism only if one assumes that feminism is the humane movement it purports to be.

In fact the book is no reversal at all, but a logical, if absurd, conclusion. Login Access your Commentary account. Email address. On the other hand, it must be admitted that to take these themes in isolation is to violate the whole spirit of the book, which drives, over some two hundred thousand words, to connect them up in a grand, emphatic, shadowy historico-cultural theory.

This theory, in its least problematic form, goes as follows. Most human societies strongly wish to procreate. They have observances and structures which encourage and assist the bearing and rearing of children.

Another group of societies has partly relinquished the arrangements which aided procreation, and the techniques which controlled it. They have substituted conjugal structures, an ideal of sex as a good in its own right, and new, artificial methods of limiting births.

These societies fail to understand the practices and principles of the other, larger group, and they have been seeking to impose on them, in particular, their own means of birth-control.

As mentioned before, a large area of shadow in this concerns the identity of the villain-societies. Their two leading traits — their family structure and their approach to sex — seem to be out of synchrony for most of history. It matters a great deal for the theory how old the nuclear, sex-extolling culture is, because so much appeal is made to the antiquity and naturalness of the other form.

Indeed, if the first kind of culture antedates Wilhelm Reich, and vulcanised rubber, Protestantism, and Mariolatry, and all the other things that are vaguely incriminated as its causes at various points in this book, it may claim to have been maintaining optimum procreativity by its arrangements just as virtuously as the abstinent, infanticidal extended families of the non-European world.

Most writers would have been deterred at this point by the recognition that they were about to contradict everything that had hitherto been argued: but not Ms Greer. She does not falter. Out goes that startling picture of a child-hating, -avoiding, -obstructing, -segregating culture. What, then, is there to choose between the behaviours of the two groups?